Student Computer Intake — What You Might Not Know…

Today we will begin to take in the computers for 12th graders for our summer work.  I realized earlier that most people probably have no idea what this process looks like and how it needs to be structured so we don’t lose track of any computers.  I’m very proud of the fact that since 2012 we have not lost track of a single unit.  That’s not to say we haven’t had computers that are lost by students or stolen from students — that has happened.  But, all of these devices are accounted for and locked — rendered useless. The scope on this is amazing when you think about it.  Over the last five years, we will have processed over 12,000 device exchanges for Macbooks alone — distributing computers and collecting them.  That doesn’t include all of the Chromebooks and iPads we track as well.

Here’s how the process will work this year.  Students will come down to the technology office in the HS — thanks to the leadership team at the high school for being flexible on this location.  Each student computer has a barcode we’ve attached that we scan and “checks it in” to our Google Sheet.  This Sheet is amazing!  It tracks all barcodes, serial numbers, and device repair history.  Once the device is checked it, one of the techs looks it over to quickly assess if there’s any obvious damage — cracked screens, missing accessories, or other visible damage.   If there is damage, we note this on a paper form that is attached to the device.  We’ll go through all of the devices during June to get a list of fines together before registration packets go out in July.  The device is then arranged by homeroom and checked off a paper list.  At the end of each day, we re-check the paper list with each device.  Then, at the end of the main intake days, all homerooms are checked again (each device is touched) to ensure we have the right device in the right spot.  We then begin the work to track down the missing computers.  Typically, after the main intake is complete (around the last day of school) we need to track down 70-80 devices.  Some of these just have not been turned in.  But, there are a number of exceptions we deal with — students who need to keep devices to finish coursework to graduate.  Others need them for student council obligations.  Then there are special programs

We then begin the work to track down the missing computers.  Typically, after the main intake is complete (around the last day of school) we need to track down 70-80 devices.  Some of these just have not been turned in.  But, there are a number of exceptions we deal with — students who need to keep devices to finish coursework to graduate.  Others need them for student council obligations.  Then, there are special programs like super seniors.  By the middle of June, we usually have all devices accounted for in inventory.  This is when we send out the list of student fines — these must be paid before a device will be given out in the fall.  We then begin our process of re-imaging and redistribution for the fall.  This another pretty in-depth set of tasks, but the long and short of it is we touch each device to put new software on it, put a new label on each computer bag, and re-organize the entire fleet into homerooms for the 2017-18 school year.

Again, I am amazed and proud that after all of this shuffling, we have never lost track of a device.  We are blessed to have a great team doing this work.  Angela, Collin, Charlie, Chris, and Sam all contribute ideas and shape these processes and refine them each year.  We’ve significantly changed, and in most cases, improved the process each year.  This is a tribute to their hard work and talent.  I’m also very thankful for the high school staff, students, and administration’s flexibility, cooperation, and helpfulness.  This really is an endeavor that requires a full team to be successful.

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